Great lesson tips

Bring your lessons alive by using all five senses. Here are some suggestions to spark your imagination.

Enacting miracles…

Children love miracles. When teaching, find ways to “recreate” them so children can experience the delight and wonder that they bring. Here are a couple of ideas:

Water to wine Enact the Lord’s first miracle (John 2:1). You will need 2 pitchers, one pitcher that is clear (glass or plastic) and one that you cannot see through (pottery or plastic) and cups. Fill the clear pitcher with water. Put a grape juice concentrate in the bottom of the pottery/plastic pitcher before your lesson. Make sure the children do not see the concentrate. As you tell the story, pour the water from the clear pitcher into the pottery pitcher. When you finish the story, pour a cup of the water turned into wine for each child to drink.Make Aaron’s rod into a serpent (Exodus 7:8). You will need a rubber or plastic snake and a stick. Trim a tree branch or stick into Aaron’s rod. Throw it down as Aaron did. When it touches the ground, remove the stick (hide it behind your back) and throw down the snake. As you reach to pick it up, use one hand to grab the serpent and bring the stick out with the other hand.

Explain the enactments after the lesson. Children need to know that the Lord really does miracles; we can only enact them!

If there’s food in the story, try some…

Many stories in the Word involve food. Prepare food as a project, or bring food to sample.

Samson and the honey in the lion’s carcass (Judges 14:8). Bring honeycomb to eat.Manna in the wilderness (Exodus 16). Sprinkle puffed millet or another breakfast cereal on a clean floor or a bed sheet for children to gather.Loaves and Fishes (Matthew 14:13). Share five small loaves and two fishes (canned sardines) from a basket.

Water play…

Many stories in the Word involve water. Children love the sensory experience of dabbling their hands in water.

Reenact the parting of the Red Sea (Exodus 14) by filling a cooking or baking tray with shallow water. Blow a hair dryer across the water (widthwise) to create a dry path for the Children of Israel to walk on. (Try this ahead of time to be sure you get the right depth to create a path with your hairdryer.)Naaman was commanded to wash his leprosy in the Jordan River. Have the children dip their hands in flour to represent leprosy and then wash seven times in the “Jordan”—a bowl of water or sink—to become clean.

Act it out…

Older children love to act out action stories from the Word. Create a simple script using text from newchristianbiblestudy.org or biblegateway.com or kemptonproject.org. Divide the text into character parts and lines. Add directions.

Use the outdoors…

Set up a tent to tell the story of Abraham and the angel visitors (Genesis 18). A large sheet will do. Use two sticks as tent poles and rope to safely secure them.For Moses and the burning bush (Exodus 3), tie flame-colored strips of fabric to branches on a bush and create a bush that is on fire but not consumed.Measure out the Tabernacle of Israel and its court on a large grassy field. Use cones or sticks and string to mark the perimeter.To illustrate the holy city New Jerusalem descending out of heaven (Revelation 21), make a model of the city and tie some fishing line to it. Put the fishing line over a high tree branch. As you read the story, make the holy city descend by lowering it over the branch.